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Cerebral Palsy

Tooth Anomalies

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Malocclusions

Tooth Anomalies
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Tooth Anomalies 

Tooth anomalies are variation in the number, size and shape of teeth.

 

Tooth Eruption:

Tooth eruption may be delayed, accelerated, or inconsistent in children with growth disturbances.  Gums may appear red or bluish-purple before erupting teeth break through the mouth. 

 

Malocclusions:

Malocclusion which is a poor fit between the upper and lower teeth, and the crowding of teeth occur frequently in people with cerebral palsy.  Muscle dysfunction contributes to malocclusion.  Teeth that are crowded or out of alignment are more difficult to keep clean, contributing to periodontal disease and cavities. 

 

Bruxism:

Bruxism it the habitual grinding of teeth and is a common occurrence in individuals with cerebral palsy.  In extreme cases, bruxism leads to tooth abrasion and flat biting surfaces. 

 

Oral Infections

Tooth decay may be linked to frequent vomiting, GER, less than normal amounts of saliva, medication containing sugar and prolong bottle feeding or snacking.  When oral hygiene is poor, the teeth are at an increased risk for decay.

 (Inga, et. al, 2001).

 

Infection

Bruxism
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Tooth Eruption
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Pica, which is the compulsive eating of non-edible substances including: sand, dirt and paint chips may also be present.  Pica can lead to the destruction of tooth structure and the damage of oral soft tissue.
 

Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) syndrome
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Dental Abnormalities Temporomandibular joint pain, malocclusions, bruxism, oral infections, and tooth anomalies may interfere with adequate chewing and bolus preparation.

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